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How the TCJA impacts retirees

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will have an impact on those who are retired as well as those who are still working. Retirees in Georgia who receive pension or annuity checks must generally pay income taxes on those earnings. While many choose to have taxes withheld on their behalf, others decide to receive the full amount of each check. This means making quarterly tax payments directly to the IRS.

How a tax debt could put a passport in jeopardy

Georgia residents and others who owe a significant tax debt could be in danger of losing their passport. If the IRS determines that a person is trying to evade paying taxes or leave the country to avoid paying taxes, it will notify the State Department. At that point, the State Department will then either not issue a passport or decline to renew one that a debtor already has.

Company offers hybrid student loan/401(k) benefit

Georgia residents and others who are making student loan payments may struggle to contribute to a 401(k) plan. However, one company recently received permission from the IRS to make contributions on an employee's behalf. It is believed that the company that offers this benefit is a health care company called Abbot. To qualify, an employee must make student loan payments equal to 2 percent or more of his or her yearly salary.

New Tax Law Prompts Companies to Consider Corporate Changes

S corporations have in recent years seen increasing popularity as the choice by many Atlanta, Georgia small business owners for the type of corporation they will establish for federal tax purposes. Although both the traditional C corporation and the S corp establish a separate entity and provide limitations on liability, the primary difference between the two is in how they are taxed.

IRS has substantial power to collect data with a summons

When the Internal Revenue Service issues a summons to a taxpayer in Georgia or third-party performing services for taxpayers, the document represents a serious request for information. Failure to comply with a summons for information could prompt the federal government to file a lawsuit against the person or organization. Although a party might have a good reason to resist disclosing information, the chances of gaining a favorable ruling in court against the IRS are low.

IRS proposing regulations for qualified business income deduction

Revamped rules governing small business taxes may result in tax breaks for Georgia business owners. The Internal Revenue Service has proposed regulations that shed light on the qualified business income deduction, including which company owners might be able to claim the deduction. According to the rules, many small business owners can take a deduction of 20 percent of qualified business income.

House wants to go around Johnson amendment

For roughly 50 years, the Johnson amendment has prohibited nonprofit organizations in Georgia and throughout the country from engaging in political campaigns. However, the House of Representatives voted to prevent the IRS from taking away the tax-exempt status of any church that supports a political candidate. The head of the National Council of Nonprofits was critical of the rule and said that it could erode the trust people have in nonprofit entities.

Tax-exempt groups face reduced reporting requirements

Some tax-exempt organizations in Georgia and across the country may no longer need to comply with some reporting requirements under guidance released by the IRS and the Treasury Department in July. Every year, charitable organizations that have a tax exemption under section 501(c)(3) must give the IRS the names and addresses of their large donors. Other types of organizations, like 501(c)(4) membership groups, also have to provide this information to the tax agency. While the information is expected to remain private, it has been exposed to the public on previous occasions.

IRS warns public about tactics used by scammers posing as agents

The demand for unpaid taxes understandably strikes fear into some Georgia residents. Unfortunately, scammers use this emotional response to trick people into handing over their money. Although people need to take legitimate notices from the Internal Revenue Service seriously, the agency routinely issues warnings about scammers who try to pressure people into paying fake taxes. In general, the IRS informs people about real tax issues through the U.S. Postal Service. The agency issues paper bills for amounts owed, and people have a right to appeal tax bills. People also have the option to pay their taxes by check, debit or credit card. Checks would be mailed to a U.S. Department of Treasury address, and credit or debit payments would be made with select processors at the agency's website.

Tips for avoiding IRS tax scams

The IRS has told people to be on alert for tax scams during the summer months. While the IRS does contact taxpayers in Georgia and around the country after the April federal tax filing deadline, they will do so by mail. Conversely, a scammer may leave a message on a person's phone demanding that the individual call or face being taken into custody. In some cases, scammers may ask that a person make a payment by wire transfer or debit card.

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