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November 2018 Archives

Reducing the tax burden on a divorced individual

Obtaining head of household status can be a boon for divorced parents who meet the criteria for it. Among the benefits is a standard deduction of $18,000 as opposed to $12,200 for those who file single. Furthermore, individuals who have the head of household status can claim a $2,000 child tax credit. Unlike a deduction that reduces a person's taxable income, a credit actually reduces what a person owes by the amount of the credit.

IRS announces new tax rules for 2019

Taxpayers throughout Georgia and the rest of the country now know what the tax brackets will be for the 2019 tax year. Individuals who make up to $9,700 will be in the 10 percent tax bracket, which is the lowest of the seven income tax tiers. Individuals who have a taxable income of $510,301 or more will pay at the highest 37 percent rate. Those who are married filing jointly will be in the 37 percent bracket if they make $612,351 and up.

Why hairstylists should report their tips

People engaged in freelance, creative or self-directed businesses in Georgia often have to pay special attention to their taxes. These cautions can also apply to tipped workers of various kinds. While restaurant workers may often receive tax documents that reflect estimated tipped income, other tipped workers like hairstylists, estheticians and personal care service providers may be tempted to avoid reporting their tips on their annual tax returns. Many stylists are not wealthy and may worry that they can ill-afford to pay extra taxes.

Retirement contribution limits to increase

In 2019, individuals saving for retirement in Georgia and throughout the country will be able to contribute more to their accounts. The IRS announced that the maximum annual contribution to an IRA will increase to $6,000 from $5,500. Those who have a 401k or similar plan will be able to contribute up to $19,000 annually starting in 2019. A person who is 50 and older will be able to make additional catch-up contributions of $1,000 into an IRA and $6,000 into a 401k.

Election workers must generally pay income taxes

Georgia residents who perform services for the government during an election must pay taxes on the income they earned. However, this income will not be subject to income tax withholding unless a worker specifically asks for that to occur. This is done by submitting a W-4 form to the agency employing the election worker.

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