Some people in Georgia might receive a notice from the IRS about verifying a taxpayer’s identity. According to one expert, these letters most often indicate that a taxpayer has been the victim of identity theft.

However, the IRS may not be easy to deal with. One woman who handled financial affairs for her elderly parents received a notice about the need to verify their identities in March. The daughter sent the documentation requested along with the three years of returns the agency asked for. However, the agency sent another letter saying the information she sent was insufficient. The next round of information she submitted was also not enough.

Multiple efforts to resolve the issue on the phone were also unsuccessful. Her parents’ attorney also tried without success. The woman finally scheduled an in-person appointment. She took her mother to the appointment where she learned for the first time that her parents’ identities had been stolen and the information was used to file a fraudulent return. This was nearly seven months after the initial contact from the agency. The Office of the National Taxpayer Advocate says that there was less than a 1 in 10 chance for people to get through on the phone during tax season. Furthermore, it usually took the agency more than the 180-day time frame to resolve the issues.

The IRS might be slow to respond, but a person should not delay in dealing with issues such as a tax lien. A person who is struggling to pay the IRS or having other issues with the agency might want to contact an attorney. While the IRS may be willing to work out a payment plan or make another type of arrangement, it also has the authority to seize assets in some cases.