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IRS grants extensions to those affected by Harvey

The Internal Revenue Service has announced tax relief for people and businesses affected by Hurricane Harvey. As another hurricane might be hitting Georgia, taxpayers in that state might soon be seeing a similar announcement in the future. The IRS has said it will automatically provide penalty and filing relief to any taxpayer whose address of record with the IRS is located within the disaster area. Individuals who live in the area, therefore, are not required to contact the IRS to secure relief.

Ransomware scam puts taxpayers in danger

Taxpayers in Georgia should be on the lookout for an email scam that may hold a person's computer data for ransom. The ransomware scheme sends a message to taxpayers using the logos of both the FBI and the IRS, and it asks recipients to download a questionnaire from the FBI. However, recipients should know that the regulations cited in the email are fake and the link does not lead to any sort of legitimate document.

Tax lien and levy not only IRS enforcement tools

Most Georgia taxpayers realize the IRS has numerous ways of recovering unpaid taxes. Common horror stories that keep citizens honest during tax season involve prison time for serious offenders, wage garnishments and possible imposition of a tax lien on real estate. It may surprise many to learn that the IRS can also exert influence over whether a citizen has the option to leave the country. Though there is no defense except for catching up on debt, there are some easy steps to avoid suffering the indignity of being refused the right to travel abroad.

Getting tax liens released

Some Georgians fall behind on their taxes or are unable to pay them in full. When a taxpayer doesn't pay what the IRS believes it is owed, the IRS may place a lien on the taxpayer's assets. When the IRS does this, the lien will apply to all of the assets that the taxpayer owns, including those that are acquired after the lien has gone into effect.

Avoiding an IRS property seizure

Fears about the consequences of IRS debt are common among Atlanta residents who owe or think they owe a tax bill. Some of the persistent worries deal with the possibility of a tax lien, wage levy or asset seizure. The individual facing possible collections actions by the IRS may need to contact an attorney for specific advice on their case and help in fighting a possible seizure. However, there are some general points that anyone can understand about the seizure process.

IRS private collectors using some problematic tactics

Partial privatization of tax collections has introduced a serious problem for Georgia residents. In some cases, collections agencies are using their affiliation with the IRS to harass people who alleged to owe the IRS money, and the tactics used are running afoul of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Suggestions are provided for citizens looking to protect themselves from illegal activity carried out by IRS collectors.

IRS warns taxpayers not to rely on its own website

Georgia taxpayers may think that they can depend on the official IRS.gov website, but the Internal Revenue Service itself has stated that this may not always be the case. Instead, taxpayers need to refer to official publications. Content like frequently asked question lists may appear on the IRS website, but they don't constitute law, and following them could place people in danger of noncompliance.

IRS issues warning about new telephone scam

The Internal Revenue Service has warned taxpayers in Georgia and around the country about a new telephone scam. According to the agency, callers posing as representatives of the IRS tell potential victims that attempts to contact them using certified mail have been unsuccessful and they must make an immediate payment using a prepaid debit card to avoid arrest. The callers are said to be adding an air of credibility to the scam by claiming that the prepaid debit cards are connected to the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System.

How to handle a tax error

Georgia residents may believe that their tax returns won't be audited after they receive a refund check. However, this is not necessarily the case as the IRS has up to three years to audit most returns. Those who receive a refund that seems too large may wish to keep the check and mention the possible error to the government. This is because the IRS may ask for the money back plus interest if a refund was mistakenly issued.

Some believe IRS needs more funding

Georgia residents may have heard that watchdog groups believe the IRS needs more resources to effectively do its job. This was according to testimony given to a House subcommittee by the Treasury inspector general for tax administration. It was also the opinion of a tax advocate who also gave testimony on May 23. However, neither had actually seen the budget before coming to this conclusion.

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